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20121001
20121031
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SFGTV2 364
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 364 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisco are also making contributions to job creation and the development of the economy in local areas. we're thinking these are very good signs. as the previous speakers mentioned, we paid a visit to the united states last february. governor brown proposed that we set up a working group for the u.s., a state, and china provinces to coope
of the embassy of the people's republic of china and the united states, based in washington, d.c.. and charlotte schultz, mr. mike rossi, senior adviser on jobs for governor brown. also officials from the delegation. the director-general of the department of foreign investment and administration. mr. wong shi. and mr. -- the commercial counselor of the department of corporation. and the director-general of the investment promotion agency of the ministry of commerce in china. we have more. the chairman of the tschida chamber of commerce -- china chamber of commerce. and from the china contractors association. and the president of the foreign trade and economic relations commission. and the deputy director general, department of commerce of the inner mongolia, autonomous region. the director of economic and trade office of [unintelligible] province. i would like to mention that locally, we have a city council member from fremont, ms. sue chan and supervisor malia cohen is in the house. thank you for coming. i remember not long ago when vice-president -- the vice- president visited the united state
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over
number one. united states is richer on a per capita basis by a magnitude of about tenfold, but china will have more economic output than the united states. it is a force that has to be reckoned with. they got this way because they have had very good growth for a number of years, but it is growing a little bit too strong. there are some small bubbles popping up in different parts of their economy, and they are trying to slow down the economy. slowing down an economy -- every government can do that. the hard part is controlling that downward trajectory. in most cases, countries that tried to slow down their economy -- they go into a crash, they go into a recession, but china is different. the best way i have to describe china's economy, to steal a line from yogi berra is one-half market economy and three- quarters centralize control economy. they are big enough. they are powerful enough that they can probably pull this off. we will have to see how it happens, but that is an important thing for the world economy. europe, on the other hand, is another story. if you believe in
by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been su
of san francisco are supporter of the united states military. san francisco fleetwood association is a nonprofit all volunteer organization that was formed to help organize and execute fleet week. and fleet week in 2012 like 2011 and 2010 has adopted a mission to promote the humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions of the united states military. we also, of course, will have the blue angels and the air show that comes with that. the ships will be coming in and the wonderful liberty call that the wonderful men and women in the armed forces will have in san francisco. the fleet week association also, as i say, has a humanitarian and response. along with the civilian disaster response community, we'll have a senior leader seminar taking place on thursday and friday in which the military and the civilian community learn from one another on how to provide disaster response. i should mention that on wednesday morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field hospital you and i might think of as a mass u
in the entire western united states that doesn't have an adequate rail connection and that promise was made because we have the opportunity here to cut the commute for tens of thousands of people everyday in half by this investment. the vast majority of the people don't own a car. they depend on transit. well today through president obama's leadership, secretary lahood leadership, the vision of the leaders on the stage we are here to commit $942 million to fulfill that promise. [applause] >> with the signing of this grant agreement we are taking $942 million paid by california taxpayers and to create jobs now when we need them. we're also using those dollars to improve the quality of life, and as jackie spear pointed out plan for the future and economic prosperity of this whole area. when this subway extension opens as senator feinstein pointed out there will be 44,000 people using this light rail line. what she didn't point out that will make it the second or third busiest light rail in the united states. this is an environment that needs to be made and once it's built are gone the day
and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. thank you very much. [applause] thank you, all. our class of commissioners for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much.
in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection that spans in our park that spans from the civil war to the cold war, including a preserve 19-missile base. some of you also know that during the 1906 earthquake, the army assisted greatly in the respo
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
at their investment portfolio. quickly, the united states economy is gaining momentum. it is on a nice, a ford trajectory. last quarter put the gdp number was the strongest of the last year, and it looks like that will continue to do better going forward. a couple of other things that are of concern i will go through quickly. the next one is that the austerity plan is going on in europe will probably cause a recession if europe is not already in a recession. china needs to avoid a hard landing, and i will talk about those topics in a little more detail. the next board is the politicians in washington really need to expend the stimulus plan they have in front of them in terms of extending unemployment benefits and the tax cuts. the u.s. economy is doing better, but it still needs the stimulus to keep going. finally, the unemployment rate is still uncomfortably high. it has come down to 8.3%, down from the 10% level. in california, it is 11.1%, down from the recent high of 12.5%, but it needs to do better. our outlook on the economy is that it is sunny with partly cloudy, but the united states i
to the united states and coming into contact with the united states so consequently my puerto rican friends, and some of my irish friends, although they were more circumspect, what are you doing writing about the irish? i'm writing about the united states. the irish are more interesting. they had to put up with colonialism, just as puerto rico is a colony of the united states. i also respect the fact that they have a facility with language, which i also enjoy. consequently, i wondered why this attraction to the irish. in 2004, the university of puerto rico asked me to come there and lecture and read. i immediately called my favorite cousin, and she said, what are you doing here? i told her and i said, please come to the reading, i have a book for you. she came. she said my son is getting married tomorrow at the caribbean hilton, could you please come? and i went. i hadn't seen her in 30 years. we were kids together. and after the wedding, there was a reception and she introduced me to her daughters, very beautiful girls, then i met the last one, very beautiful, green eyes, and she said, i w
and the united states. a bridge of love, of hope. we never believed one day we would be able to raise against this dictatorship. i knew chris after he came back. i knew chris more. he would come to the house and we play tennis. after the tennis we come back home and have libyan breakfast. he is a man of principles and he is serious. i agree he never speaks about himself, what achievement he made. he is a guy when you look for him again. this is kind of different element but one time he told me story when he was serving in tripoli and then in benghazi. he walked on the street of benghazi and looked over his back and saw two people following. whereever he goes they follow him. hen he stop and he went up to them and he said hello, how are you. yeah, they speak with him. they invite for coffee. these people of course are service. maybe not to protect him in first days but see what he is doing, his contact. this is the type of government we need in this world. he didn't go to them to protest why you are following me. no, he became friends. they became friends. this is chris stevens. i really cry f
partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states th
the beginning of the women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined
and the united states. the public art program continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspende
couldn't be more proud of all of you. so with that, i want to introduce you to the united states attorney, who is melinda haig, who is going to say some words to you. thank you. [ applause ] >> wow. you guys really are happy to be out of school. so nice to see all of you, as richard said, good morning everyone. as richard said my name is melinda haigh, the united states attorney for the northern district of border to monterey and our office is just a couple of blocks away in san francisco. [ applause ] so we love it here. many of you probably don't know what the united states attorney is or what they do or anything like that, but i was nominated by president obama to be the united states attorney here two years ago. yes, my boss. [ applause ] and i'm honored to represent him, the president, the administration and the department of justice in northern california and in san francisco and in that capacity to welcome you here today to see this movie screening. there are 800 san francisco public high school students here today. so thank you for being here. [ applause ] it's really
that united states will always seek peace. let me say not only peace, but the united states will always seek solutions to problems. we're a pragmatic people that like to have a problem [speaker not understood] and do something about it. and the other talon the eagle holds arrows to show that the united states understands that if you're going to be successful and effective in seeking peace, you must be strong. and i would say strong, and i'll use that word a little bit more loosely and say competent. you must be able to do things. so, if you take that image and you have objectives on the one talon and capability on the other, and you marry them together, that's what we in the united states have been doing, particularly since the end of world war ii. then there we were having propelled the three worlds to victory. the other of us having seen we had an aggressive adversary on our hands and looking back what a horrible last century or so, we had to do better. and we did it by this iteration of objectives and capabilities. and we put together what has amounted to a global economic and security co
of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this is a requirement inside the u.s. >> thank you. this morning secretary schultz asked one of the panels that was involved in communications and command and control about in this age of information, real-time information, how you're hit with a sea of information and how do you deal with that. something as senior leaders all of you have dealt with. and i believe admiral zukunft used the term dealing with real
that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and then i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of a member of the city college board of trustees for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, if i could present to you, rodrigo santos, the newest member of our board of trustees. [applause] >> i am honored for this great appointment. as a new member of the board of trustees, i can tell you i will do everything in my power to ensure not only do we follow the great work of former trustee milton marks. that great legacy of public service. but at the same time, i join an institution that must be saved, an institution that must be preserved.
of california, and the united states as well. i'm required to do so in a completely even-handed manner. i do so with no problem and with all the love in my heart. that being said, it would be ridiculous, disingenuous and completely unhelpful not to realize that certain segments within our population here in san francisco need help more than others. it would be absolutely preposterous for me to sit up here and tell you that we're going to approach polices of economic advantagement in an even-handed manner. that would do a disservice to and again, we are a weaker city if we allow certain segments of you are population to essentially rot. we're a stronger, vibrant and more resilient city if we address the issues of those least among us, tackle them, and face them head-on. >> thank you. >> that is what i'm about. truth and honesty in our policy approached. >> mr. resignato. >> i think one important thing we need to look at is vision. really, you know? a vision for what san francisco is going to be. and i think that involves looking at a lot of different things. one thing that daniel mentioned
and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interesting play on how these people make these adjustments, half to create home. what is home for these people? the home is their cell. people talk a lot about noise -- very noisy in prisons. that is interesting to me. looking at the communication level, the rise of frustration of being caged, wondering, where does redemption fit into the equation here? [singing] i think both of us really believe the death
the whole united states and in front of the company could tell, i was listening to him speak about san francisco. he said, "i traveled to every city in the united states, and i was disappointed with what i saw. there was not one city that i liked, but as far as i'm concerned, san francisco is so beautiful that i would like to design 15 cities in russia that look like san francisco." [laughter] and he was right. [applause] my wonderful wife, my family is here. i'm thrilled. thank you very much. i must say -- excuse me, i have to mention one thing. i have never seen anything in my life as beautiful as these young people. [applause] you stand so beautiful. [applause] -- you sang so beautiful. [applause] >> it is tony bennett day in san francisco. [applause] just fantastic. now, before we leave here today, just one more time, let's hear that special song one more time, now performed by the talented san francisco gay men's chorus, who will be joined by -- yes -- who will be joined by all of our performers here today and then all of you. you can sing along by following the lyrics on the scre
and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this
an olive branch. the eagle is looking at the olive branch to show that the united states will always seek peace. the other talon, the eagle is holding arrows to show that the united states understands if you will be effective and successful in seeking peace, you must be strong. let me expand. because it only only peace but a better kind. the elimination of poverty, better lives all over the world for ourselves and other people. the arrows don't just stand for military strength but capability, they stand for the idea that the underwill try to recruit the best and most capable to apply themselves to those grand objectives. as i studied the life of christopher stevens, he embodied that and sought the grand objectives that our dwok si stands for. we gather to mourn his loss and demonstrate to his family how much we understand their grief. we also gather to celebrate the immense accomplishments this man has made for us. i picked out of my closet a tie. says on it democracy is not a spectator sport. christopher stevens was a participant. a full, strong, effective participant in his beloved demo
% of the water consumed in the united states. water is the basis for manufacturing many goods and provides the ability to clean and sterilize everything from computer chips to the surgical instruments used in hospitals. kelly: the minute that there's not enough water for businesses, industry, and individuals, they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united states, we don't pay a heck of a lot for water. curtis: at an average cost of about $2.50 for 1,000 gallons of tap water, it is a great bargain. garvin: but the rates that are b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 364 (some duplicates have been removed)